Rinema is the best way to share movies you love.

Ant-Man (2015)

aka Ant-Man

Directed By: 
Details: 117 mins · English

Trailers:

From your network:

Signin to view reviews from people you are following.

From Everybody:

Size Doesn't Always Matter... But It Helps

I went into Ant-Man expecting very little, both literally and figuratively. After Edgar Wright, one of my favorite directors in the industry, left the project due to creative disagreements and was replaced by Peyton Reed, known for Yes Man, The Break Up, and Bring It On, it was hard for me to have any hope for the project. Regardless, I decided to see the film anyway out of interest in giving it the benefit of the doubt. What I was faced with was a mixed bag, where the good is awesome and the bad is completely dull. But, ultimately, there’s enough good here that outweighs what doesn’t work, leaving audiences with a pretty middle-of-the-road film.

A lot of this stems from Ant-Man being confused as to what genre it wants to be; it pulls in some of the superhero charm and action sequences, the break-ins of a heist flick, the stereotypical redemption plot we’ve seen many times before, and a little bit of the downright bizarre, something that the film embraces, accentuating many of its mo...(more)

I went into Ant-Man expecting very little, both literally and figuratively. After Edgar Wright, one of my favorite directors in the industry, left the project due to creative disagreements and was replaced by Peyton Reed, known for Yes Man, The Break Up, and Bring It On, it was hard for me to have any hope for the project. Regardless, I decided to see the film anyway out of interest in giving it the benefit of the doubt. What I was faced with was a mixed bag, where the good is awesome and the bad is completely dull. But, ultimately, there’s enough good here that outweighs what doesn’t work, leaving audiences with a pretty middle-of-the-road film.

A lot of this stems from Ant-Man being confused as to what genre it wants to be; it pulls in some of the superhero charm and action sequences, the break-ins of a heist flick, the stereotypical redemption plot we’ve seen many times before, and a little bit of the downright bizarre, something that the film embraces, accentuating many of its moments positively. And while some of this works very well, others feel out of place or simply banal in its shortsightedness.

If there was any Marvel film I could compare this to, it would be Guardians of the Galaxy, one of my absolutely favorites from the MCU. It tries to pull on your heart-strings while simultaneously be very humorous and present some crazy action sequences. However, the comedy style is very different; while Guardians director James Gunn looked to retain a lot of wit and smart humor, developing his characters through it, Reed instead utilizes awkward humor, something that is Paul Rudd’s specialty… perhaps too much so. When it works, it works amazingly well; this film had me outright laughing on multiple occasions. But other times it hardly felt like Rudd was acting, simply passing through a movie set while giving his two cents. It’s a hard form of comedy to pull off, especially when it needs to be done consistently, and this film relies almost completely on its comedic attributes.

This is what makes the fight sequences so special, because Ant-Man the character provides a lot of unique angles and variables that a lot of people wouldn’t consider until seeing it first hand; and it provides for a lot of incredibly creative and innovative uses for the suit, providing some of best choreography in fighting the Marvel has to date as well as the most funny fight sequences. Seriously, the action in Ant-Man is the absolute highlight, something that I did not expect, but it’s where the film presents its most original ideas and leads us into some frankly out-there territory that was very refreshing, moving away from a somewhat hackneyed formula.

The other way we see humor is through some minor characters, who I found to be rather hilarious at times. However, it’s fair to note that these figures are basically racial stereotypes, with a team composed of an African American, Russian, and Mexican acting more like their nationalities than having their own personalities. But, for me at least, it worked well, and kept the focus on the characters we were supposed to hone in on.

I’ve touched on Paul Rudd a little, but he does a pretty stellar job overall, keeping the delivery of lines at a nice pace and adding some earnestness to the sometimes lacking film when needed. Evangeline Lilly, playing Hope van Dyne, helps with this, adding more emotion to the film than most of the others through her struggles to relate to her father. While she starts as something of a blank slate, she builds to be one of the more engaging females in the MCU. Michael Douglas, playing Hank Pym, gives a more straight performance, though having his stand-out moments. Being limited by Pym’s insecurities and more serious nature, he does a moderate job pulling the film back after a particularly funny moment, reminding us of the stakes at hand.

The stakes, however, are pretty low when compared to some of the more recent films. The infiltration of a terrorist organization or saving the world from a massive alien invasion this is not, but instead the mass production of military tech, a tired idea that we’ve seen in all three of the Iron Man films; there’s also some easy comparisons that can be made between Pym and the Starks, particularly their self-destructive tendencies, that only add to the feelings of deja vu. And, as this, alongside exposition, is what composes a majority of the first act of the film, the movie starts incredibly slowly up until our first bit of heist-based action. And, while the film works to build the stakes, it never really feels that way, as I, as an audience member, was more invested in Scott Lang’s search for redemption than I was in Hank Pym’s grumpy old man struggles… even if it would have meant some serious issues with world peace ultimately.

This is all thanks to the villain of the film, Darren Cross, who, being a dejected mentor to Pym, strove to recreate the legendary shrinking technology of Pym Particles, resulting in the Yellowjack suit. Now, let’s get this out of the way right now; Cross is a contender for one of the worst Marvel villains to date. Based on the first act, he would hold the title firmly, but thanks to the third act that works to build the character into a somewhat menacing figure, I would say that he at least ties with the likes of Malekith, who is so poorly represented in Thor: The Dark World that it’s hard to stomach. However, he feels more like Justin Hammer from Iron Man 2, the manipulative business man who looks to mass produce a product he seems to understand very little about. He does so, however, with very little in terms of personality; at least Hammer was whiny and annoying (never thought I’d say that). Cross just has a blind bitterness with no other qualities. The third act circumvents this nicely though, and salvages what it can from the otherwise dull antagonist.

What isn’t dull, however, is the third act, which I’ve already mentioned once or twice. This is a movie that builds, with the second act bringing some pretty clever moments and character building that undoes some of the damage the first act does, and the final act pulling everything together in an incredibly satisfying manner. That coupled with a fairly satisfying ending and two exciting post-credits scenes, it’s undeniable that this is what audiences are coming for.

Ant-Man does what it does well really well and what it does poorly incredibly so. It was one of the worst openings and villains, but some of the best action sequences and creative perspectives. And it, hands down, has the best cameo to date (and no, I’m not referring to Stan Lee). Ant-Man, as I ruminate on it, stands out more and more in my mind as something original and different when it comes to the superhero genre, something that should be considered and ultimately rewarded in a film industry where superhero films are easy fodder. It’s certainly not the best, but it does something to stand out, and deserves to be seen by anyone who considers themselves a Marvel fan, whether it be of the comics or the films. (less)

1 like
  Comment
Gravatar
420 chars remaining..!!

A breezy caper that tweaks the superhero formula.

Even if you’re feeling superhero fatigue from Marvel’s recent rapid-fire release of films and DC’s upcoming slew of pictures, Ant-Man will still find a way to revitalize your faith in the genre. Neither as serious as DC’s superhero flicks nor as grandiose as Marvel’s other movies, Peyton Reed’s Ant-Man is refreshing because it takes a lighthearted, narrow approach that integrates influences from other film genres.

The silly, sarcastic bent to Ant-Man’s material is tailor-made for leading man Paul Rudd, who steps outside his traditional comedic roles to portray an action hero, while still playing to his strengths. Rudd is the perfect mix of charming and sincere as Scott Lang, a Robin Hood-like thief in search of redemption. He is well-supported by a cast of actors with solid comic timing, like Michael Pena, who brings a motor-mouthed goofiness to his role as Lang’s best friend. In addition to funny dialogue and character interactions, another source of humor...(more)

Even if you’re feeling superhero fatigue from Marvel’s recent rapid-fire release of films and DC’s upcoming slew of pictures, Ant-Man will still find a way to revitalize your faith in the genre. Neither as serious as DC’s superhero flicks nor as grandiose as Marvel’s other movies, Peyton Reed’s Ant-Man is refreshing because it takes a lighthearted, narrow approach that integrates influences from other film genres.

The silly, sarcastic bent to Ant-Man’s material is tailor-made for leading man Paul Rudd, who steps outside his traditional comedic roles to portray an action hero, while still playing to his strengths. Rudd is the perfect mix of charming and sincere as Scott Lang, a Robin Hood-like thief in search of redemption. He is well-supported by a cast of actors with solid comic timing, like Michael Pena, who brings a motor-mouthed goofiness to his role as Lang’s best friend. In addition to funny dialogue and character interactions, another source of humor in the movie comes from Lang’s attempts to master control of his Ant-Man suit, which allows him to change his size on a moment’s notice and lets him communicate with ants. Seeing him struggle with strategically shifting size is hilarious, and (more importantly) believable, due to the picture’s fantastic special effects.

Ant-Man isn’t just inspired by comedy though. It is also influenced by heist flicks. At the movie’s center is Hank Pym (Michael Douglas), the inventor of the Ant-Man suit. Pym and his daughter Hope (Evangeline Lilly) are fighting to prevent the technology that powers the suit from falling into the wrong hands, namely those of Pym’s bitter protégé Darren Cross (Corey Stoll). To prevent the power hungry Cross from replicating his technology, Pym concocts a scheme to steal Cross’s prototype suit and enlists Lang in to help him do it. The planning and execution of this heist add a great deal of excitement to Ant-Man you wouldn’t normally find in other superhero films. Some of these heist elements are more convoluted than they need to be though and disappointingly, the action in them largely follows a predictable template.

A final thing that differentiates Ant-Man from its peers is its narrow dramatic focus. The film concentrates on familial relationships and mines engaging emotions from them instead of focusing on grand universe altering themes. There is a strong storyline that tackles the loss of Hank Pym’s his wife and how her death affected his relationship with Hope. The movie explores his attempt to make amends for his failures as a father and to reconnect with his daughter. Similarly, Lang tries to repair his relationship with his own daughter, which was damaged by his time in jail. Plus, both Lang and Cross fight for Pym’s attention as a mentor and foster father, each doing their best to win his approval. However none of these weightier themes in Ant-Man would work without the talents of gifted actors like Douglas, Lilly, and Stoll to take them on. Douglas adds the necessary gravitas to the role of Hank, Lilly provides the appropriate amount of resentment, and Stoll is deliciously diabolical without becoming cartoonish.

While it doesn’t break a ton of new ground as a superhero film, Ant-Man is breezy caper that tweaks the traditional formula enough to renew your faith in a genre that’s starting to become tired and cliché. (less)

1 like
  Comment
Gravatar
420 chars remaining..!!
gave

great

Soo much better than my expectations. I love all the Marvel-movies, and was a bit afraid that this was the one that messed their streek of great movies up - but it wasn't :-)
Absolutly a great watch.

1 like
  Comment
Gravatar
420 chars remaining..!!

Cast:

Small Scott Lang / Ant-Man
Small Hank Pym
Small Hope Van Dyne
Small Darren Cross
Small Paxton
Small Maggie Lang
No_movie_poster Cassie Lang
Small Luis
Small Kurt
Small Dave
Small Peggy Carter
Small Howard Stark

Crew:

No_movie_poster Peyton Reed Director
Small Edgar Wright Writer
Small Joe Cornish Writer
Small Adam McKay Writer
Small Paul Rudd Writer

Plot:

The next evolution of the Marvel Cinematic Universe brings a founding member of The Avengers to the big screen for the first time with Marvel Studios’ “Ant-Man.” Armed with the astonishing ability to shrink in scale but increase in strength, master thief Scott Lang must embrace his inner-hero and help his mentor, Dr. Hank Pym, protect the secret behind his spectacular Ant-Man suit from a new generation of towering threats. Against seemingly insurmountable obstacles, Pym and Lang must plan and pull off a heist that will save the world.