Rinema is the best way to share movies you love.

Drag Me to Hell (2009)

aka Drag Me to Hell

"Christine Brown has a good job, a great boyfriend, and a bright future. But in three days, she's going to hell."

Directed By: 
Written By: 
Details: 99 mins · English, Czech, Spanish, Hungarian · PG-13 (USA)

Trailers:

From your network:

Signin to view reviews from people you are following.

From Everybody:

Excellent

Personally, I'll give anything made by Sam Raimi a chance (except The Grudge, I tend to ignore that he had a hand in that). There's just something about his films that makes them unique, from his early days making the Evil Dead series to this little gem, Drag Me to Hell. Raimi works his signature magic by interspersing comedic elements with the overall creepiness of the story. Which, I might add, is pretty original. Thus is Sam Raimi's mastery.

The film follows a woman who is cursed by a gypsy woman after slighting her. She is told she is going to be literally dragged to hell by a lamia, a malicious goat-like spirit. What follows is a mind-boggling and stomach-turning series of events with an auspicious finale, including an eyeball cake, a séance, and a number of bodily fluids.

What makes Drag Me to Hell so excellent is its pacing. Raimi is a master at his genre, opting against cheap scares in favor of something much scarier: the inevitable. The prospect of being dragged to hell ...(more)

Personally, I'll give anything made by Sam Raimi a chance (except The Grudge, I tend to ignore that he had a hand in that). There's just something about his films that makes them unique, from his early days making the Evil Dead series to this little gem, Drag Me to Hell. Raimi works his signature magic by interspersing comedic elements with the overall creepiness of the story. Which, I might add, is pretty original. Thus is Sam Raimi's mastery.

The film follows a woman who is cursed by a gypsy woman after slighting her. She is told she is going to be literally dragged to hell by a lamia, a malicious goat-like spirit. What follows is a mind-boggling and stomach-turning series of events with an auspicious finale, including an eyeball cake, a séance, and a number of bodily fluids.

What makes Drag Me to Hell so excellent is its pacing. Raimi is a master at his genre, opting against cheap scares in favor of something much scarier: the inevitable. The prospect of being dragged to hell weighs on the protagonist like a drunken mistake, driving her to do things she would never dream of doing in her right mind. You'll know when you see it, but one of them is pretty extreme. The scary bits start out relatively benign; sudden breezes, things going bump in the night. But soon it becomes an all-out weirdfest, with people and things being tossed around willy-nilly and WAY too many bodily fluids. If there's one horror writer who knows his disgusting special effects, it's Raimi. Remember that claymation decomposition sequence at the end of Evil Dead? Yeah, I do too. Vividly.

Considering that this was Raimi's first horror film since his Evil Dead days, I would say that Drag Me to Hell is proof that he has not lost his touch. He's one of the few horror writers still passionate about the genre, and here's hoping for many more quality Raimi productions. (less)

1 like
  Comment
Gravatar
420 chars remaining..!!

Silly splatter

Quite fun, if you don’t think about it too much. Characterisation is minimal and dialogue is functional, but it’s just a frame on which to hang a series of well-orchestrated scares. As usual with Sam Raimi the tone is all over the place, but it’s mostly cartoonish horror (one scene featuring an anvil is like something straight out of Road Runner) with plenty of “Ewww!” and “Boo!” moments. For some reason many of the icky scenes involve matter being forced either into or out of people’s mouths. Maybe Sam has oral “issues”?

Gravatar
420 chars remaining..!!
Gravatar
420 chars remaining..!!

Cast:

Small Christine Brown
Small Clay Dalton
Small Sylvia Ganush
Small Rham Jas
Small Mr. Jacks
Small Shaun San Dena
Small Leonard Dalton
Small Stu Rubin
Small Trudy Dalton
Small Ilenka Ganush
No_movie_poster Milos

Crew:

Small Sam Raimi Director
No_movie_poster Grant Curtis Producer
Small Ivan Raimi Author
No_movie_poster Peter Deming Director of Photography
Small Robert G. Tapert Producer
No_movie_poster Christopher Young Music
Small Sam Raimi Production
Small Sam Raimi Writer
No_movie_poster Bob Murawski Editing

Taglines:

"Christine Brown has a good job, a great boyfriend, and a bright future. But in three days, she's going to hell."

"Christine Brown has a good job, a great boyfriend, and a bright future. But in three days, she's going to hell."

Plot:

In 1969 in Pasadena, California, a couple seeks the aid of the medium Shaun San Dena (Flor de Maria Chahua) saying their son (Shiloh Selassie) has been hearing evil spirits' voices after stealing a silver necklace from gypsies. San Dena aids the family by carrying out a seance, but they are attacked by an unseen force that pulls the boy into hell. The medium says she will encounter the force again one day.

In today's Los Angeles, bank loan officer Christine Brown (Alison Lohman) hopes to be promoted to assistant manager over her co-worker Stu Rubin (Reggie Lee). Her boss, Jim Jacks (David Paymer), advises her to demonstrate that she can make tough decisions to get a promotion. Christine is visited by an elderly woman, Sylvia Ganush (Lorna Raver), who asks for an extension on her mortgage payment. Christine, though empathetic with the old woman's crisis, decides to deny Ganush an extension to prove herself to her boss. Ganush begs Christine not to repossess her house and kneels in front of her, but Christine gets scared from the woman's bizarre pleading as she is helping her to stand up and calls the security, who take Ganush away while Ganush blames Christine for "shaming" her. Jim compliments Christine on how she handled the situation.

When the working day is over and Christine goes to the bank parking garage to head home, Ganush attacks Christine in her car, rips a button off Christine's coat and uses it to place a curse on her as revenge. Later, Christine and her boyfriend Clay Dalton (Justin Long) meet the fortune teller Rham Jas (Dileep Rao), who tells Christine that she is being haunted by a spirit. At her home, Christine is attacked by the spirit and has nightmares about Ganush. At work the next day, Christine snaps at Stu and has a projectile nosebleed that soaks her boss in blood. She runs away and Stu is seen secretly taking a file off Christine's desk.

Christine then goes to talk to Ganush at her soon-to-be-taken home, only to find that she died the previous night and a wake is being held. Christine returns to Rham Jas, who explains that as long as Christine is the owner of an accursed object (her button), she will be haunted by a powerful demon called the Lamia (not to be confused with the Greek child-eating demon) that will torment her for three days before taking her to hell. He suggests a sacrifice to appease the demon. The next day, the Lamia returns and thrashes Christine in her bedroom. Desperate to stop the attacks, Christine sacrifices her pet kitten, an act that leaves her heart-broken. At a dinner party with Clay and his parents, she is again tormented by the Lamia, but this time through the use of illusions, which frightens the Daltons.

Christine returns to Rham Jas for further help. He says that Shaun San Dena (Adriana Barraza) will risk her life to stop the demon for a fee of $10,000. Further supernatural attacks on Christine lead Clay to pay the fee. San Dena prepares a seance to trap the Lamia's spirit in a goat and kill it to vanquish the spirit. San Dena allows the Lamia to inhabit her body. Rham Jas tries to persuade it not to steal Christine's soul, but it refuses and vows never to stop until Christine dies. Christine then places San Dena's hand on the goat, causing the spirit to enter its body. San Dena's assistant, Milos, attempts to kill the goat, but is instead bitten by the goat and in turn becomes possessed, attacking the members of the seance. San Dena banishes the Lamia from the seance, but dies in the process. Christine thinks the medium has overcome the Lamia, but Rham Jas explains that she only managed to drive the spirit away until the next day, when it will come back for Christine. Then he seals the cursed button in an envelope and tells Christine that before the next day comes, she can get rid of the curse by giving the button to someone as a gift, thereby passing the curse on to that person.

After being driven home by Clay, who doesn't know what actually happened at the seance, Christine attempts to find a recipient for the curse. She decides to give the envelope to Stu in revenge for his stealing her work, but changes her mind after seeing how pathetic, tearful and panicky Stu is when he meets her. With guidance from Rham Jas, Christine learns that she can give it to Ganush even though she is dead because "the soul never dies". Christine drives to the cemetery where she is buried and digs up her grave. In a torrential downpour, Christine jams the envelope in Ganush's mouth in anger and gets out of the grave just in time before dawn.

Christine then returns home. Preparing to meet Clay at Los Angeles Union Station from where they plan to depart for a weekend in Santa Barbara, she gets a phone message from her boss telling her that she landed her dream position after Stu confessed to stealing her work and was fired. At the station, Christine also buys a coat that she has been eyeing for a long time, as a sign of a new beginning. Clay, planning to propose, reveals to Christine that he found the envelope containing the cursed button in his car. Christine then realizes she mixed up her envelope with another that she gave to Clay when she accidentally dropped it. Horrified, Christine backs away and falls onto the tracks. As a train barrels towards her, fiery hands burst from the ground under the tracks. Clay can only watch in horror as Christine is dragged down into the fiery abyss of hell, and is left holding Christine's cursed button.

Release Dates:

Theatrical : 2009-05-29 : United States of America

DVD : 2009-10-13