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Inside Out (2015)

aka Inside Out

Directed By: 
Details: · English

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Excellent concept. Horrible execution.

Unfortunately, I was really disappointed by this. I'd loved the trailer, and ADORED the first 15-20 minutes, but then Joy and Sadness got sucked out of the control center, and it all just deteriorated from there. I absolutely hate movies where the main characters have to get back somewhere before something goes horribly wrong, and everything just works against them - and that was ALL the major part of this movie was!!! When the train crashed I'd just about had it. Seriously? I watched this at the movies, otherwise I'd probably picked up a book around this point so I wouldn't have to give it my entire attention.

I loved Joy, but Sadness was a spoiled brat. She doesn't know why she's acting out, yet she insists on touching all memories, even though she knows what that does to them? Sheesh! I'm impressed Joy didn't slap her!

And while I know Anger, Fear and Disgust aren't the best emotions to have in control, I find it really difficult to believe that they'd make that bad decisions t...(more)

Unfortunately, I was really disappointed by this. I'd loved the trailer, and ADORED the first 15-20 minutes, but then Joy and Sadness got sucked out of the control center, and it all just deteriorated from there. I absolutely hate movies where the main characters have to get back somewhere before something goes horribly wrong, and everything just works against them - and that was ALL the major part of this movie was!!! When the train crashed I'd just about had it. Seriously? I watched this at the movies, otherwise I'd probably picked up a book around this point so I wouldn't have to give it my entire attention.

I loved Joy, but Sadness was a spoiled brat. She doesn't know why she's acting out, yet she insists on touching all memories, even though she knows what that does to them? Sheesh! I'm impressed Joy didn't slap her!

And while I know Anger, Fear and Disgust aren't the best emotions to have in control, I find it really difficult to believe that they'd make that bad decisions the minute Joy isn't around. After all, Fear is the mother's main emotion, and Anger is the dad's.

So yeah, I was MAJORLY annoyed and frustrated with most of this movie, and yet... it did have a lot of things going for it, and as much as the bad part BUGGED me, the good parts were really, really, really good. I loved the beginning... I loved the ending... I just hated everything in between.

*sigh* (less)

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An Imaginative Film for Kids and Adults

Pixar’s Inside Out is one of those rare animated films that children and adults can appreciate in equal measure. Leveraging its most imaginative premise in years, Pixar has crafted a creative story that works as both a straight ahead narrative and as a metaphor. Because of that,Inside Out will make viewers of all ages laugh and cry as it explores themes about the importance of family and coping with the difficult transition from childhood to adolescence.

The film mainly takes place inside the head of Riley (Kaitlyn Dias), an 11-year-old girl whose family moves from Minnesota to San Francisco. Inside the command center of Riley’s head are a team of emotions that have helped her make memories and navigate life: Joy, Sadness, Fear, Anger, and Disgust. Up until this point Joy (Amy Poehler) has been the dominant emotion driving Riley and building memories that define her personality through nodes (islands) in her head.

After the move though, Sadness (Phyllis Smith) s...(more)

Pixar’s Inside Out is one of those rare animated films that children and adults can appreciate in equal measure. Leveraging its most imaginative premise in years, Pixar has crafted a creative story that works as both a straight ahead narrative and as a metaphor. Because of that,Inside Out will make viewers of all ages laugh and cry as it explores themes about the importance of family and coping with the difficult transition from childhood to adolescence.

The film mainly takes place inside the head of Riley (Kaitlyn Dias), an 11-year-old girl whose family moves from Minnesota to San Francisco. Inside the command center of Riley’s head are a team of emotions that have helped her make memories and navigate life: Joy, Sadness, Fear, Anger, and Disgust. Up until this point Joy (Amy Poehler) has been the dominant emotion driving Riley and building memories that define her personality through nodes (islands) in her head.

After the move though, Sadness (Phyllis Smith) starts to have an alarming influence on memories that no one can explain. In the fight to protect Riley’s core memories from Sadness’s effect, Joy and Sadness get sucked outside the command center. Without Joy at the helm and the core memories there to define Riley, the important islands that define Riley start to crumble. Can Joy and Sadness make it back in time before Riley is lost? And can Fear (Bill Hader), Anger (Lewis Black), and Disgust (Mindy Kaling) keep things together in the meantime?

Like all Pixar movies, this one is engaging because the characters have strong arcs and the voice talent is superbly cast. What sets Inside Out apart however is how evenly it plays to both children and adults. What makes it entertaining for kids is the playfulness it uses to construct areas of Riley’s head like Imagination Land, Abstract Thought, and Long Term Memory. Humorous characters there like Riley’s imaginary friend Bing Bong (Richard Kind), serve up lots of jokes that appeal to a younger audience and several that only an older one will understand.

Inside Out is emotionally engrossing for adults for how it tackles the complexities of growing up. Seeing Joy realize that Sadness is a necessary part of life, is a touching experience that will pull on your heartstrings. That’s because grown ups of all ages can identify with how complex emotions are and how often they blend together during the transition from childhood to adolescence. The universalness of this experience makes Inside Out so accessible to so many different audiences and sets it apart as an impressive film. (less)

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Forced Emotion

Pixar has certainly hit a low these last few years, with new concepts such as Brave failing to impress and old franchises producing less than stellar sequels, such as Cars 2 and Monster's University. Inside Out looked to be no exception, so I chose to more or less avoid it until now. I'd heard some tidbits and pieces here and there, and even had some of the narrative spoiled for me beforehand, but nothing prepared me for how utterly dull the whole affair was.

For those unfamiliar, the concept of this film is that we are following the emotions of a 11 year old girl named Raleigh as she deals with moving away for her home and getting accustomed to a new environment. Joy is a control freak who feels like Raleigh should only ever be happy. Well, that's not entirely true, as she lets Fear, Anger, and Disgust have their moments "in control" of Raleigh's emotions. She does, however, have issues with Sadness because she... makes Raleigh sad. But when the two of them are suddenly flung from t...(more)

Pixar has certainly hit a low these last few years, with new concepts such as Brave failing to impress and old franchises producing less than stellar sequels, such as Cars 2 and Monster's University. Inside Out looked to be no exception, so I chose to more or less avoid it until now. I'd heard some tidbits and pieces here and there, and even had some of the narrative spoiled for me beforehand, but nothing prepared me for how utterly dull the whole affair was.

For those unfamiliar, the concept of this film is that we are following the emotions of a 11 year old girl named Raleigh as she deals with moving away for her home and getting accustomed to a new environment. Joy is a control freak who feels like Raleigh should only ever be happy. Well, that's not entirely true, as she lets Fear, Anger, and Disgust have their moments "in control" of Raleigh's emotions. She does, however, have issues with Sadness because she... makes Raleigh sad. But when the two of them are suddenly flung from the control room of Raleigh's mind, they have to work together- kind of- in order to get back.

What drove me crazy about the movie was how poorly put together it was from the perspective of logic. Almost nothing in this film makes sense, from how memories are supposed to work to how each of the emotions show different emotions when interacting to how certain parts of Raleigh's personality can disappear and not effect her much, or how a statement made can destroy an entire trait of hers. It's all so forced and jumbled, leaning way too heavily on the metaphorical concepts that it never takes a step back to see the big picture. Some viewers might be okay writing it off as imaginative, but I couldn't get past some of these details that made the world feel so dull.

Speaking of the world being dull, Raleigh's imagination is perhaps the most unimaginative space Pixar has explored yet. Seriously, the entire landscape is just a mishmosh of ideas, as that's more or less what memories can be if they're all thrown together. So much of it is either rows of emotion capsules or areas that represent a number of random memories or concepts. We hardly even get to see large chunks of it, sections feeling more like abstract ideas that disappear on a whim rather than having any impact or importance. It feels very cut and dry, unoriginal in how it's portrayed.

The story doesn't fair much better, as it's all based on convenience. Joy has no reason to dislike any of the other emotions that deviate from her image of a perfect, happy life for Raleigh, but Sadness just so happens to be a problem, and the two of them are the ones who happen to get stranded, etc. The beats of the plot are so been-there-done-that even Joy's energy can't instill what's going on with any life. Largely, it's forgettable and tedious to have to sit through.

The only parts of the film I found enjoyable were the introductory segment and some of the bits with Anger. The first portion of the film involves following Raleigh through a large part of her early development that made me crack a smile more than once. It's an interesting perspective on growing up that got me excited for an otherwise uninteresting movie. As for Anger, he's utilized for easy comedy similar to the rage of a YouTube gamer. He got me with some easy laughs, but they were forgettable lines in a forgettable movie.

At the end of the day, that's what Inside Out boils down to; I have a hard time really remembering moments or anything interesting going on in the movie. Most of it is Joy and Sadness almost being where they need to just for something, anything to just haaaaaaaaaappen to go wrong so that they can be set back just a liiiiiiiiiiittle bit further. It's lazy writing that forces the story to run in circles for an hour and a half, repeating bits out of desperation of having a solid run-time. If you're Pixar fan, you've probably already seen this, but I can only really recommend he movie to kids, and even then there are much better films to show your young ones. For me, this movie flopped, only solidifying my lack of faith in what Pixar has to offer moving forward. (less)

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Cast:

Small Joy
Small Fear
Small Disgust
Small
Small Sadness
Small Anger

Crew:

Small Pete Docter Directing
No_movie_poster Jonas Rivera Production
No_movie_poster Michael Arndt Writing
Small Pete Docter Story Contributor
Small John Lasseter Production
Small Andrew Stanton Production
Small Pete Docter Writing
Small Josh Cooley Writing
Small Bill Hader Writing
Small Amy Poehler Writing

Plot:

Release Dates:

Theatrical : 2015-06-19 : United States of America

Theatrical : 2015-06-26 : France

Theatrical : 2015-08-26 : Italy

Theatrical : 2015-08-28 : Sweden

Theatrical : 2015-10-01 : Germany