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The Great Gatsby (2013)

The Great Gatsby (2013)

aka The Great Gatsby

Directed By: 
Details: 143 mins · English

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Amazing by all means

I'm a big fan of the book so trust me when I say this movie is a very faithful adaptation. I'm too stunned to come up with words but all I can say is, the second the movie starts you will be taken to another world, to Gatsby's world.
Wonderful cinematography, effects, costume design, locations, story and outstanding performance by the cast especially DiCaprio who plays Gatsby.
Will The Great Gatsby get an Oscar nomination? Well it certainly should. Go and meet this unforgettable Gatsby. Now!

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i know it will, i know it will i know that it wiiiillllll

Well, A Novel based Movie always haunts...

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Good, But Not Great

There have been a surprising number of Gatsby adaptations over the years, and understandably so; the novel is seen as such a classic, and rightfully so, in my humble opinion. It’s such a deep character study of a complex and intriguing individual that reflects the idealistic dreams of many brought to an extreme. We are, as the narrator puts it, “within and without” in that sense. However, none of the previous films held any weight in my mind, coming off as a bit too drab and dull for my taste, especially for such a flashy and exuberant character.
And, in this sense, it seems like the director of this film heard my pleas and injected this work with so much color and noise and flare and pizzazzy oomph that it hurts. No, like, it actually hurts the film; much to my chagrin, the film seriously overdoses and overindulges itself in the bombastic nature it tries to represent. The CGI in particular is overabundant very quickly, feeling so unnecessary and out-of-place in such an old-timey setti...(more)

There have been a surprising number of Gatsby adaptations over the years, and understandably so; the novel is seen as such a classic, and rightfully so, in my humble opinion. It’s such a deep character study of a complex and intriguing individual that reflects the idealistic dreams of many brought to an extreme. We are, as the narrator puts it, “within and without” in that sense. However, none of the previous films held any weight in my mind, coming off as a bit too drab and dull for my taste, especially for such a flashy and exuberant character.
And, in this sense, it seems like the director of this film heard my pleas and injected this work with so much color and noise and flare and pizzazzy oomph that it hurts. No, like, it actually hurts the film; much to my chagrin, the film seriously overdoses and overindulges itself in the bombastic nature it tries to represent. The CGI in particular is overabundant very quickly, feeling so unnecessary and out-of-place in such an old-timey setting. But what feels more out of place is the rap and pop songs that blare during some of the early party scenes. Yes, some of the most recent and popular tracks of last year are actively used in the soundtrack of a film that’s meant to take place in the early 1900’s. I’m unsure of what the purpose of doing that was, but it immediately pulled me out of the experience, helping profusely to hinder the first third of the film.
But, that’s the thing; these issues only really crop up during the first third. Afterwards, the script and style open up immensely to embrace the strong literary work that the film is based on. It tends to slow down a little more, embrace the lines that it would have otherwise raced past trying to establish a stable opening. And, as we finally get to delve into the man that is Gatsby, the piece allows for an intimacy that’s lost on the chaos and hubbub presented before Gatsby becomes our focus. In this way, I think this sentiment speaks to the strengths of the original, as the script carries along much of the action when the visuals doesn’t always, favoring style over the substance the world should show. And yes, the “old sport”s do get a bit tiresome after a while, but I can’t really fault the film for being faithful to the original; however, I do feel that some of these could have been cut in order to make some of Gatsby’s speech sound a little more natural, although perhaps that’s the point.
While it does have its shortcomings, as any film adaptation seems to have these days, The Great Gatsby does shine in many regards, mostly on an emotional level, resonating in many ways with hardships that are problems in peoples’ lives to this day, reminding me why the story holds up so well. And, while some of the casting choices may have not been the best (Toby McGuire, while not terrible, especially when compared to his Spiderman stint, does falter from time to time), Leonardo DiCaprio is surprisingly stellar at what he does here, showing me just how far he’s come over the years, showing off some serious acting chops recently. The start may be hard to get through for most, but the profits afterwards are undeniable, making it a little more than just some adaptation. Check it out, especially if you’re a fan of the book. (less)

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gave

Decent after the first hour

This film is entirely too Baz Lhurmanny for my taste. The style in which it's shot is annoying, as is the anachronistic and terrible hip-hop soundtrack. The first hour especially was dreadful, good thing I dozed through half of it. After Gatsby and Daisy meet up, the movie really picks up, and the film does a very good job creating a sense of melancholy at the end, and showing us what horrible people all of them are.

Leo DiCaprio gives a phenomenal performance as Gatsby, making him less likable than he was in the book. In general, this is a very strong cast, all giving good performances. Don't think I need to see it again though, I'll just reread the book instead.

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Cast:

Small Jay Gatsby
Small Daisy Buchanan
Small Myrtle Wilson
Small Nick Carraway
Small Meyer Wolfsheim
Small George Wilson
Small Henry
Small Jeffery Wilson
Small Catherine
Small Teenage Jay Gatsby
Small Languid Girl
Small Tom Buchanan
No_movie_poster Nelson

Crew:

No_movie_poster Baz Luhrmann Director
No_movie_poster Baz Luhrmann Screenplay
No_movie_poster Craig Pearce Screenplay
No_movie_poster F. Scott Fitzgerald Novel
No_movie_poster Douglas Wick Production
No_movie_poster Baz Luhrmann Production
No_movie_poster Lucy Fisher Production
No_movie_poster Jason Ballantine Editing

Plot:

Nick Carraway (Tobey Maguire), a Yale University graduate and World War I veteran, is a depressed and disillusioned alcoholic staying in a sanatorium for treatment of his alcoholism. He talks about a man named Gatsby, describing him as the most hopeful man he had ever met. When he struggles to articulate his thoughts, his doctor (Jack Thompson) suggests writing it down, since writing is what brings him solace.


In the summer of 1922, Nick moves from the U.S. Midwest to New York, where he takes a job as a bond salesman. He rents a small house on Long Island in the (fictional) village of West Egg, next door to the lavish mansion of Jay Gatsby, a mysterious business magnate who holds extravagant parties. Nick drives across the bay to East Egg for dinner at the home of his cousin, Daisy Buchanan (Carey Mulligan), and her husband, Tom (Joel Edgerton), a college acquaintance of Nick's. They introduce Nick to Jordan Baker (Elizabeth Debicki), an attractive, cynical young golfer with whom Daisy wishes to couple Nick.


Jordan reveals to Nick that Tom has a mistress who lives in the "valley of ashes", an industrial dumping ground between West Egg and New York City. Not long after this revelation, Nick travels with Tom to the valley of ashes, where they stop by a garage owned by George Wilson (Jason Clarke) and his wife, Myrtle (Isla Fisher), who is Tom's lover that Jordan mentioned. Nick goes with Tom and Myrtle to an apartment that they keep for their affair, where Myrtle throws a vulgar and bizarre party, with her sister Catherine (Adelaide Clemens), that ends with Tom breaking her nose as she taunts him about Daisy.


As the summer progresses, Nick receives an invitation to one of Gatsby's parties. Upon arriving, he learns that none of the guests at the party, though there are hundreds, have ever met Gatsby himself, and they have developed multiple theories as to who he is. Nick encounters Jordan, and they meet Gatsby (Leonardo DiCaprio), who is surprisingly young and rather aloof, in person. Gatsby seems to take a liking to Nick and the two become mutual friends. Their friendship develops after Gatsby takes Nick out to lunch with his mysterious friend Meyer Wolfshiem (Amitabh Bachchan). Through Jordan, Nick later learns that Gatsby knew Daisy from a romantic encounter in 1917, and is still madly in love with her. He spends many nights staring at the green light at the end of her dock, across the bay from his mansion, hoping to one day rekindle their lost romance. Gatsby's extravagant lifestyle and wild parties are an attempt to impress Daisy in the hopes that she will one day appear at Gatsby's doorstep. Gatsby now wants Nick to arrange a reunion between him and Daisy. Nick invites Daisy to have tea at his house, without telling her that Gatsby will be there also.


After an initially awkward reunion, Gatsby and Daisy reconnect, and they begin an affair. Shortly after, Daisy and Tom attend one of Gatsby's parties, where Tom grows increasingly suspicious of his wife's relationship with Gatsby. Throughout a luncheon at the Buchanans' house, Gatsby stares at Daisy with such undisguised passion that Tom realizes Gatsby is in love with her. Though Tom himself is involved in an extramarital affair, he is deeply outraged by his wife's infidelity. He forces the group to drive into New York City, where he confronts Gatsby in a suite at the Plaza Hotel. Tom asserts that he and Daisy have a history that Gatsby could never understand, and he announces to his wife that Gatsby is a criminal whose fortune comes from bootlegging alcohol and other illegal activities. This pushes Gatsby to his breaking point, and he has an explosive outburst of anger, much to his own dismay. After this incident, Daisy realizes that her allegiance is to Tom, who contemptuously sends her back to East Egg with Gatsby, attempting to prove that Gatsby cannot hurt him.


When Nick, Jordan, and Tom drive through the valley of ashes, however, they discover that Gatsby's car has struck and killed Myrtle, Tom's lover. They rush back to Long Island, where Nick learns from Gatsby that Daisy, wanting to calm her nerves, had been driving the car at the time of the accident. However, Gatsby intends to take the blame. Despite the events that occurred at the Plaza, Gatsby is convinced that Daisy will call him the next day. That night, he reveals to Nick that he was born penniless, and his real name is James Gatz. In the morning, Nick leaves for work while Gatsby decides to go for a swim before his pool is drained for the season. He asks for the telephone to be brought down to the pool, still waiting for Daisy to call. The night before, Tom tells Myrtle's husband, George, that Gatsby was the driver of the car. George jumps to the conclusion that Gatsby had also been Myrtle's lover, and he retrieves a gun. Back at the mansion, Gatsby hears the phone ring, and believes it to be Daisy. As he is climbing out of the pool while looking hopefully across the bay at Daisy's mansion, he is abruptly shot and killed by George, who immediately turns the gun on himself. It is revealed that it is Nick on the phone, and he hears the two gunshots.


When Nick calls the Buchanans to invite Daisy to Gatsby's funeral, he learns that she, Tom, and their daughter, Pammy, are leaving New York. Only the press, whom Nick chases out, attend the funeral. The media accuse Gatsby of being both the murderer and lover of Myrtle, leaving Nick as the only one who knows the truth. Back in the sanatorium, Nick finishes his memoir and titles it, "The Great Gatsby".

Release Dates:

Theatrical : 2013-06-07 : Norway

Theatrical : 2013-06-14 : Brazil

Theatrical : 2013-06-14 : Japan

theatrical : 2013-05-17 : India

Theatrical : 2013-05-10 : India

Theatrical : 2013-05-10 : Taiwan

Theatrical : 2013-05-10 : United States of America

Theatrical : 2013-05-15 : Belgium

Theatrical : 2013-05-15 : France

Theatrical : 2013-05-16 : Argentina

Theatrical : 2013-05-16 : Denmark

Theatrical : 2013-05-16 : Germany

Theatrical : 2013-05-16 : Greece

Theatrical : 2013-05-16 : Hong Kong

Theatrical : 2013-05-16 : Hungary

Theatrical : 2013-05-16 : Italy

Theatrical : 2013-05-16 : Netherlands

Theatrical : 2013-05-16 : Portugal

Theatrical : 2013-05-16 : Russia

Theatrical : 2013-05-16 : Serbia

Theatrical : 2013-05-16 : Singapore

Theatrical : 2013-05-17 : Estonia

Theatrical : 2013-05-17 : Finland

Theatrical : 2013-05-17 : Ireland

Theatrical : 2013-05-17 : South Africa

Theatrical : 2013-05-17 : Spain

Theatrical : 2013-05-17 : Sweden

Theatrical : 2013-05-17 : Turkey

Theatrical : 2013-05-17 : United Kingdom

Theatrical : 2013-05-30 : Australia

Theatrical : 2013-05-30 : Chile

Theatrical : 2013-06-06 : New Zealand

Theatrical : 2013-06-07 : Mexico